Tag Archives: Mental Health

A Long Way Down By Nick Hornby


Hornby is so good at illustrating our life’s unspeakable pain with acerbic humour. A Long Way Down is not actually about committing suicide. It is about how life can open up another chapter if we don’t die. On another new year’s eve, it makes me ponder how many people out there need a heart-to-heart conversation, and how we can start this conversation … I wish everyone a prosperous 2017. I also hope that we all can take a moment to care for the people around us.

Stoicism, Wabi Sabi and Constantly Moving Targets

Vague, confusing title.  Or perhaps intriguing and poetic?  Maybe both?  Neither?   Did you know that 1 in 10 people in the US is taking some form of psychiatric medication?  Did you know that the US is one of only 2 countries in the world that allows direct to consumer drug advertising?  When the Reagan administration was moving to pass legislation to first allow this advertising, the heads of many pharmaceutical companies actually opposed it.  Pharma heads were indeed a different breed at that time.  Slowly, slowly, one small decision at a time, one justification at a time, a whole culture shifts and a whole industry, …..well, darkens. Continue reading

Something Queer to Read: Fiction and Memoir

Because this week is York Pride Fest, and because of the recent anti-LGBT mass murder in Orlando this past weekend, I have decided to write a couple of posts highlighting books by and about LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, and other gender and sexual minorities) people. Please also check out my list of non-fiction resources.

Anyway, here are some of my favourite LGBTQIA+ books and authors:

genderGender Failure, by Rae Spoon and Ivan Coyote

This book is based on Spoon and Coyote’s live show of the same title. It contains the text of the stories they told as well as Spoon’s song lyrics, and some of the images from the show. Gender Failure explores both of the authors experiences growing up and not fitting into the gender binary, and the ways in which they have found authentic identities as non-binary people. Continue reading