Category Archives: Help & FAQs

Digital Bookmobile at Pierre Berton Resource Library

Digital BookmobileThe Digital Bookmobile is coming to Pierre Berton Resource Library this Friday! Drop by between 12 to 6 p.m.  and check it out yourself. This 75-foot long tractor-trailer is packed to the rafters with all things digital content. Learn how to access eBooks from the library 24/7 and experience everything our OverDrive digital collection has to offer. Wander through Audiobook Alley, check out the eBook Experience, and drop into the Gadget Gallery for some hands-on practice using the most popular devices.

OverDrive Digital Bookmobile

Digital BookmobileVaughan Public Libraries (VPL) invites you to experience the OverDrive Digital Bookmobile on Friday, September 11 at Pierre Berton Resource Library from 12 to 6 p.m. This 75-foot long tractor-trailer is packed to the rafters with all things digital content. Learn how to access eBooks from the library 24/7 and experience everything our OverDrive digital collection has to. Wander through Audiobook Alley, check out the eBook Experience, and drop into the Gadget Gallery for some hands-on practice using the most popular devices. Enjoy books today at http://ebooks.vaughanpl.info.

In the Library with a Kayak

Have you ever had that sinking feeling (not the kind of being crept up upon by Colonel Mustard in the library with a candlestick)? Last week while paddling on Lake Simcoe I literally did. After about twenty minutes of paddling  my rear bulkhead was filling with water and needed to be pumped out. My paddling buddy got nominated for the bailing duty (Thanks R.O.!).

With all the hauling my kayak has seen over the last decade, this was bound to happen (See the condition of the stern below).

Kayak with Hole

I looked into ways to fix the brand of kayak I have and it suggested plastic welding in the repair instructions. This type of repair can only be done if the kayak is made of high density polyethylene (HDPE). I also found a number of repair videos for kayaks made of HDPE.

A few really stood out for me, though. One straightforward one was How to Repair Plastic Kayaks using a heat gun. Another do-it-yourself video included more extensive repairs to a previously crudely modified kayak where the vlogger was adept at matching  original boat colour in Kayak Modification and Polyethylene Welding using a plastic welding tool akin to a soldering iron and heat gun. The Boat Welding showed the most expertise in plastic welding with a heat gun and plastic welding rods but then again he wasn’t a DIYer.

 

Tools and Equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a lot of how-to video watching, I decided on the heat gun method. I also gathered a few other tools:

  • Leather gloves
  • Water bottle
  • Scraper
  • Knife
  • Putty knife
  • Sanding block with 50 grit paper
  • Wooden stir stick
  • Rubbing alcohol (not pictured)

Polyethylene ShavingsI first sanded and cleaned the surface with rubbing alcohol to remove debris and oxidation. I then harvested plastic from my boat. Good places for this are under the cockpit combing or behind the seat (if it is the same material as the boat).

 

 

Added PolyethyleneSpreading  PolyethyleneI then heated the patch site and the plastic slivers on the putty knife. I then applied it to the boat and spread it out as some of the surrounding area was thin as well. The wooden stir stick and metal scrapper were also useful in spreading the plastic.

In all, I added three layers of plastic to the repair site. The water was used to cool the plastic and the sanding block also provided a way to apply even pressure over an area to mold the shape of the warm plastic.

Next, I sanded the surface to even out the repair. Then I did a final re-heat to smooth the surface.

 

Sanded PolyethyleneRepaired KayakAll that was left was to take the kayak out for a test paddle. Result? Bone dry bulkhead!

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer. While reasonable efforts were used to provide accurate information on this post, it is for general guidance on matters of interest only.  All information on this post is provided “as is”. All information contained on this post is distributed with the understanding that the authors, publishers and distributors are not rendering professional advice and accordingly assume no liability whatsoever in connection with its use. It is your responsibility to evaluate the accuracy, completeness and usefulness of any opinions or other information provided through consultation with your boat manufacturer and qualified repair personnel.