Category Archives: Digital Collections

Vikings

cover imageI came across Vikings quite by accident. Browsing the shelves at the Maple Library one day, I noticed the cover first. Intrigued, I flipped the DVD over, read the back, and proceeded to check it out. I was hooked within minutes, and four seasons later, I’m still hooked!

Inspired by the life of Ragnar Lothbrok, Vikings is a historical drama that follows early Medieval Norsemen as they raid, trade and explore the world. Wanting more than just the life of a farmer, Ragnar rises to fame by sailing to and raiding England, gaining the title of Earl, and eventually, King. He will easily become one of your favourite characters. The story itself is exciting and entertaining, and does a great job of exploring the ethics, religion and social structure of the Vikings, their enemies and their allies.

       Great content, great actors, great theme song! This is must watch TV!

Online Courses! For FREE! No, really!

One of the less-known gems of the Vaughan Public Libraries online collection is the access we can give you to free online courses (just click on the Learn tab on our Lifelong Learning page). Here, you’ll find a list of different platforms available for various kinds of learning. We can help you out with, seriously, almost any topic imaginable, including options like:

CHET BAKER: portraits of a tragic artist as an older man

Born to be BlueI was pleased recently, to catch Born to be Blue, the new Chet Baker bio-pic for a couple reasons: [A] I’ve since reconciled my admiration for the cinema of Ethan Hawke and, [B] I’m a big Chet Baker fan.

So first things first, let’s deal with the movie. This might be the perfect time for Hawke to step into a Chet Baker role. Perfect because Hawke’s (now) craggy and weathered look embodies nicely the lived-in-hard features that so defined Baker in his later years. Back in the day, the younger Hawke was certainly fresh and good looking enough to portray the prettier, more iconic Baker of the 1950s. Sure, one might argue that a depiction of Baker’s artistic and personal peaks – when he made the recordings he is most famous for today – would be the ideal period to present. It was only a few short years and Baker was surrounded by giants of jazz. But Born to be Blue chooses instead to give us the older, gaunt, damaged Baker whose fame had by then receded.

Continue reading